1. Money wins Elections

    Keep scrolling. See how money distorts your government, and what you can do about it.

    There were 435 House elections in the 2012 cycle.

    The candidates that outspent their opponents won 95% of them.

    Michelle Bachmann outspent Jim Graves and won

  2. A tiny group of powerful funders give our politicians the money they need to win elections.

    Less than 1% of Americans,

    contribute 68% of all election funding

  3. These big funders use their influence to lobby for policies and laws that benefit themselves.

  4. Should there be stricter laws regulating gun-ownership?

    Congress received $240,000 to support this
    Congress received $5,600,000 to oppose this
     

    Source: Gun Control vs. Gun Right" —Center for Responsive Politics

  5. Should there be stricter guidelines for food marketed to children in schools?

    Congress received $2,200,000 to support this
    Congress received $51,000,000 to oppose this
     
  6. Should the Keystone XL Pipeline transporting oil from Alberta to Texas be approved?

    Congress received $175,000,000 to support this
    Congress received $5,000,000 to oppose this
     
  7. Should the CISPA Cybersecurity Bill be passed?

    Congress received $605,000,000 to support this
    Congress received $4,300,000 to oppose this
     
  8. Real change can’t happen when elections can be bought.

    It’s a rigged game.

    But we can fix it.

  9. Here’s How

    The American Anti-corruption Act gives $100 to each voter every election cycle, to invest in politicians they believe in.

    Together, this gives ordinary citizens up to $7,500,000,000 in citizen directed campaign funding.

    *Where does this number come from? Didn't it say 30 billion earlier?

    The American Anti-corruption Act gives ordinary citizens the influence we deserve.

  10. You can fix Congress. Tell Congress to pass the American Anti-Corruption Act

      Not ? Click here.

      Want more detail? Read the Act and learn more about it, or watch Lawrence Lessig’s TED talk.

    This is part of Tony Chu’s MFA Interaction Design thesis project at the School of Visual Arts. You can reach me @tonyhschu or tonyhschu@gmail.com.

    Attributions: Capitol Hill photo via Wikipedia. Icons: Oil, Gun and Broken Computer designed by Chris Broughton from The Noun Project